Showing posts with label Firefox. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Firefox. Show all posts

Monday, August 18, 2014

Firing up a blog post with the browser based ScribeFire blogging tool

What's on my PC - ScribeFire – A Browser Based Blogging Editor

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After many hours of research and trying all of the advice and procedures out there, Microsoft .NET Framework 3.5 would not install. I actually could write an article just on that topic. I finally came to the realization that Microsoft Live Writer is now Microsoft Dead Writer and figured, “if Microsoft was serious about keeping Microsoft Live Writer alive, they would not require us to jump through hoops just to install it on a new operating system”.  At this point, I started to look around for another blogging editor and discovered that there are quite a few out there; but, what caught my attention is that most of these editors have not been updated in several years. Is this a sign that blogging is going to the wayside???

What I did come across, that I believe is going work for me, is a blogging editor that is actually a browser extension, called ScribeFire. As a matter of fact, this article is my first using ScribeFire. I like the idea that I can draft an article in my browser and that the extension is available for different browsing platforms (Google Chrome, Firefox, Opera and Apple Safari browser). In my case I use Google Chrome; therefore, I installed ScribeFire from the Chrome Web Store. The initial setup was very, very easy (and fast). After entering my login credentials for WordPress my recent posts, categories, tags, etc.…; all fell into place.

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With ScribeFire you can post to blogs from WordPress, Blogger, TypePad, Windows Live Spaces, Xanga, LiveJournal, or any other blog that supports the MetaWeblog or MovableType APIs. From what I can see so far, everything I need to draft and post a blog article is there. You can edit and update existing posts. You can schedule posts for the future (if your blog allows that). You can delete posts. You can save drafts. You can tag and categorize. You can upload images. You can edit visually, or you can use HTML or Markdown. You can post to multiple blogs at once. My biggest obstacle, right now is learning to navigate around.

If you decide you want to save your article as a draft, simply click on “Save Progress”; then go to WordPress to put on the final touches using the WordPress editor OR if you want, click on “Publish Post” and the post will be immediately published.

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While I love my Windows Live Writer (I'm using it to write this) I am worried about its future and it's really starting to show its age. There's hope that it has a future, but at this point it's a hope only... (A New [WLW] Hope... This is the blogging app you've been looking for... Well, we can only hope ;)

ScribeFire looks pretty interesting and looks like a nice temp stand-in. There's no add-ins, which for me is one of the killer WLW features, but it's quick, free (ad supported), fast, web/browser based and seemed to work well (I used it to quickly edit a post and in that case, it was faster and easier than WLW ;)

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While we all hope WLW has a future, until we hear there is, it's time to keep our eyes open for a replacement... :(

Wednesday, July 04, 2012

Making some cross browser Metro buttons with the CSS3 Microsoft-Metro Buttons (CMMB) library

Ginktage - Free Download – CSS3 Microsoft-Metro Buttons

"As per the developer, the CSS3 Microsoft-Metro Buttons is inspired by Tim O’Donnell’s CSS3 Google Buttons, Twitter Bootstrap, and Microsoft Icons from glyphicons.com and SyncFusion’s Metro Studio.

CSS3 Microsoft-Metro Buttons weighs about 21 KB and is a light weight and easy to use CSS or JavaScript library which uses CSS3 styles for rich button design.

The CSS3 Microsoft-Metro Buttons are cross-browser compatible from Internet Explorer 8 to the latest versions including Google Chrome and Mozilla Firefox.

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ace-subido / css3-microsoft-metro-buttons

"Inspired by Microsoft's Metro Design Language, I was in need of a metro-styled CSS3 button library. I wanted to make similar metro-looking buttons used by Microsoft (extensively used in their Microsoft Windows Azure website) So I've built a very small, simple and clean CSS3 library to deal with my problem.

My goal is to help developers out there shave off some wasted time building that metro-like stylesheet by providing them a library, a starter kit, a base on which they can build upon.

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Demo and Documentation

http://ace-subido.github.com/css3-microsoft-metro-buttons has a live demo and the library documentation

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http://ace-subido.github.com/css3-microsoft-metro-buttons/

CSS3 Microsoft-Metro Buttons (CMMB)
Inspired by Microsoft's Metro Design Language, I was in need of a metro-styled CSS3 button library. I wanted to make similar metro-looking buttons used by Microsoft (extensively used in their Microsoft Windows Azure and Codeplex websites) So I've built a very small, simple and clean CSS3 library to deal with my problem.

Thus CSS3 Microsoft-Metro Buttons (CMMB) was born. Weighing in at a healthy 21KB (compressed, 4KB gzipped), it's a light-weight and easy-to-use CSS/JS library that uses CSS3 styles for rich button design. The library can also work with Twitter Bootstrap. The buttons are also cross-browser compatibile from IE8, to the latest version of Chrome, and Firefox so you don't have to spend countless minutes testing on different browsers.

License

You can use this library for any projects you have in mind, although it would be nice if you give credit to me and/or mention me in twitter.
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License.

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Nothing like a little CSS3 Metro buttons for the 4th of July... (okay, yeah, that doesn't make any sense... Sorry, it's been a long week... :)

Friday, February 03, 2012

Firefox Tilt turns page element visualization on its side...

ArtLung [Joe Crawford] - Firefox Tilt

"This is a screenshot of a somewhat useful, great looking web development tool. It’s called Tilt and it’s an add-on for Firefox. What it does is visualize the various elements, or tags on an HTML page in a 3-D space. You can interact with it and click to see what HTML and CSS makes each component. I find it useful sometimes to help me understand what’s why on the page.

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Like Joe says, this is pretty much overkill, but cool as heck....