Showing posts with label Ruby. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Ruby. Show all posts

Wednesday, January 02, 2013

DPack 3.5.x is out (Think VS2012++ version)

Visual Studio Gallery - DPack

DPack is a FREE collection of Microsoft Visual Studio 2012 tools. DPack is designed to greatly increase developer's productivity, automate repetitive processes and expand upon some of Microsoft Visual Studio features.

DPack includes various browser tools that allow the developer to quickly find solution files, types, particular type members, methods or properties for instance, or quickly find and reference standard .NET framework types. DPack includes greatly enhanced numbered bookmarks feature, various code navigation tools as well as streamlined surround with feature, and much more. See screenshots and learn more about individual features using Features menu.

Major features included:

  • Code Browser
  • File Browser
  • Solution Browser
  • Framework Browser
  • Numbered Bookmarks
  • Surround With
  • Code Navigation
  • Solution Statistics
  • Solution Backup

All features support C#, VB, C++ and Ruby In Steel based projects.

www.usysware.com/dpack/

DPack - What's New

v3.5.1, January 1, 2013

New Features and Improvements:

  • First Visual Studio 2012 RTM compatible version. Visual Studio 2012 RC and betas are no longer supported.
  • Improved File Browser dialog mode performance for large solutions. If solution file structure doesn't change then File Browser will cache the collected information in memory to be re-used on the next request.
  • Improved browsers performance processing solutions with Setup type projects.
  • Modified Code Browser to differentiate between fields and constants.
  • Added Command Prompt to Solution Explorer context menu item.
  • Reworked Tools|Options dialog to make it easier enable/disable individual features.
  • Chrome/Oxygen language based projects are no longer supported.

As you can see below, I've been following DPack for years now. It's great to see it continue to grow.

Related Past Post XRef:
DPack 3 (3.0.1) is out - Think VS2010 RTM, VS2008 versions and with great tasting filling too…
DPack 2.8.1 Released (Now with VS2008 RTM Support)
DPack 2.6.1 Released (Last VS2003 Version)
DPack 2.5.1 with Visual Studio 2005 (RTM) Support Released
DPack 2.2.0 Released...
DPack 2.0 is live
USysWare DPack Home (1.3.2 Released)
USysWare DPack Home [Free VS 2003 Add-ins]

Saturday, December 24, 2011

Windows Phone 7 + IronRuby + Online Library Hosting + Auto Updating = LiveLibs

livelibs

Welcome to LiveLibs.com!

What's this LiveLibs thing?

In a nutshell, LiveLibs is a set of tools and technologies that allows you to have self-updating code running on Windows Phones.

Excuse me? You mean I can deploy bugfixes and add features to my apps instantly?

Yep! You don't have to wait for the whole Marketplace approval process to take place, or for users to go ahead and do the updates. Your apps will be automatically updated the next time they communicate with the LiveLibs website.

Neat! Tell me more.

You can create "live" code libraries - Live Libs, in other words - for use by your own apps, or as public libs for anybody to use. That way others could benefit from your libs, too! And, of course, when you update a public lib, everyone else using it can automatically get the updated version.

Wow, that's awesome. But there's a catch, right?

Unfortunately, yes. There is one major thing you need to be aware of: the self-updating code must be written in Ruby. Specifically, IronRuby. But Ruby is a hot language; you know you want to try it out.

How can I be sure that someone else's library update won't mess up my app?

LiveLibs provides a way for you to do your own quality assurance. The biggest issue affecting app stability when using LiveLibs is if your app is using someone else's public lib, and that lib gets updated with unstable code. To mitigate this problem, LiveLibs allows you to have "hints". Hints are small pieces of information (stored online) intended for an app that uses LiveLibs, which tell the app what versions of what libs it should download. In other words, if your app uses FooLib 1.0, but version 2.0 of that library is incompatible with your code, you can have a hint specifically for your app that tells it to only download version 1.0 of FooLib instead of getting the latest one. Naturally, you can always update your hints once you've tested that new versions of third party libs work well with your deployed apps.

..."

That sounds interesting. And cool. And I wonder if this won't run into a Marketplace EULA/TOS issue in the future. Still, I dig the idea...

 

(via http://www.reddit.com/r/wp7dev - Announcing LiveLibs ~ have auto-updating code in your Windows Phone apps!)

Tuesday, November 20, 2007

Ruby.Net 0.9 Released

"We are please to announce the release of version 0.9 of Ruby.NET, you can download it now from our new home page at http://rubydotnet.googlegroups.com/web/Home.htm.

This is the first open source community edition of Ruby.NET. In July of this year, the team at QUT decided to transfer complete control and ownership of the project to the Ruby and .NET open source communities and to strongly encourage others to directly contribute to and steer the project (staff at QUT remain, however, strongly committed and heavily involved in the project).

This new version includes substantial improvements, including improved Ruby/.NET interoperability, .NET subtyping, creation of .NET delegates using Ruby blocks and support for visual design of Windows Forms applications within Visual Studio. We’ve also fixed lots of bugs and are close to getting Ruby on Rails to run successfully.

We look forward to you feedback. A Google group has been set up for discussing the Ruby.NET compiler project. The email address is RubyDOTNET@googlegroups.com and you can join at http://groups.google.com/group/RubyDOTNET.

We are getting close to releasing our first "production quality" release, version 1.0. If you are interested in using Ruby.NET for "production purposes", please contact us as we'd be happy to work with you in creating some showcase examples of real world usage.

If you are interested in contributing, please visit http://rubydotnet.googlegroups.com/web/ForContributors.htm - we need all the help that we can get!

Also, please help us by spreading the world about this release and the project via whatever blogs, email lists, friends, networks, media etc that you have access to and you think would be appropriate." [Email posted in full]

Thanks for the heads-up Wayne... :)

 

Related Past Post XRef:
Ruby.Net (fka Garden Point Ruby.Net) Moving to a New OSS Model (and works in Visual Studio 2005...)

Wednesday, July 18, 2007

Ruby.Net (fka Garden Point Ruby.Net) Moving to a New OSS Model (and works in Visual Studio 2005...)

ruby-talk-google - Ruby.NET moves to full open source community model

"The Gardens Point Ruby.NET project (http://www.plas.fit.qut.edu.au/Ruby.NET) would like to announce that we are moving to a new open source community model.

While we at QUT will continue to be heavily involved in the project, we plan to transfer full control and ownership of the project to the open source community. To signify this new beginning, the new project will be named simply "Ruby.NET" (rather than "Gardens Point Ruby.NET") and a new licence agreement will be developed (by the community). ..."

QUT - Gardens Point Ruby.NET Compiler

"New Beta Release 0.8.1 (June 2007)

We are pleased to announce the release of a new Beta (version 0.8.1) of the Gardens Point Ruby.NET compiler. Since the last release we have added support for interoperability with other .NET languages, so that components developed using other .NET languages can conveniently use classes implemented using Ruby.NET and vice versa. The following example shows how we can now write a Ruby.NET program that uses the standard .NET libraries:

...

Previous Release Annoucement (May 2007)

We are pleased to announce the release of a new Beta (version 0.7) of the Gardens Point Ruby.NET compiler. Since the last release we have added support for debugging (by generating pdb files) and have created a Visual Studio integration package allowing users to edit, build, execute and debug Ruby programs within Visual Studio 2005.

..."

Want to play with Ruby, but don't want to give up Visual Studio 2005? Then Ruby.Net may be your ticket to Ruby'ness...

 

(via TheServerSide.Net - GardensPoint Ruby.NET goes open source)